Chris Linder Photography - Science and Natural History Storytelling

Exhibits » River Doctors: Taking the Pulse of the World's Largest Rivers

Synopsis

Doctors learn about the health of a person by studying their blood. Earth scientists learn about the health of a river—and the land surrounding the river, or watershed—by studying the chemistry of its water. Changes on land, including deforestation, climate change, and other disturbances, can all be measured through river water.

As the human population swells to 9 billion people in the coming decades, the demands on river systems will increase. Understanding the links between land, river, and ocean is vital for predicting how Earth’s water and chemical cycles will change in the future.

Schedule of events

  • February 21, 2014, 5-6:30pm - Artist's Talk and Reception, Flaten Art Museum, St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minnesota
  • April 2nd, 2014 - Exhibit closes at St. Olaf and moves to Massachusetts for future venues

Press

Learn more

  • Global Rivers Observatory - the photographs in this exhibition were taken as part of the Global Rivers Observatory project.



Installation at the Flaten Art Museum, St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minnesota



Resources and links

IPY logo

Funding for the Global Rivers Observatory project and the River Doctors exhibit was provided by the National Science Foundation.

St. Olaf logo

The exhibit was created by Chris Linder with the collaborative assistance of the Flaten Art Museum, Northfield, Minnesota.

WHRC logo

The Global Rivers Observatory is co-managed by researchers at the Woods Hole Research Center.

WHOI logo

The Global Rivers Observatory is co-managed by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.